Episode 26 — Betrayal

The experience of betrayal is painful, confusing, and damaging to one’s basic sense of self and reality. The betrayer is often seized by feelings that demand gratification and involve self-deceit, abandonment of responsibility and empathy for the other. Are there ever times when betrayal is necessary for growth, either as the betrayed or the betrayer? Can betrayal be used as a call to deepened feeling, increased consciousness and more creative self-expression?

 

In this episode, we refer to Impossible Love: or Why the Heart Must Go Wrong by Jungian analyst Jan Bauer and The Art of Loving by Erich Fromm. Here’s a link to Nina Paley’s animated film Sita Sings the Blues.

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Here’s the dream we discuss:
“I was in a house that belonged to my parents, but it wasn’t a house my parents have ever actually lived in. My boyfriend and I were fooling around in the bathtub. I was enjoying myself but he warned me that we were making a mess. I turned around and saw that we had somehow flooded the bathroom with several inches of water. I started to panic about how angry my parents were going to be. There was a radio on the floor that was an actual radio that my dad owned when I was a child. I was afraid to step out of the tub and into the water because I thought I’d be electrocuted. I was able to lean out and unplug the radio, and music that I hadn’t realized was playing stopped. I jumped out of the tub to grab a bucket to try to deal with the water, but by then most of it had drained away. I was trying to scoop up what was left and dump it down the drain. My boyfriend wasn’t helping and I was getting mad at him. He seemed to think it wasn’t any big deal because the water was almost gone. I told him that the water had obviously drained into other parts of the house, causing damage and that my parents were still going to be angry.”

Photo by Kelly Sikkema on Unsplash